Song Lists

Behold (with O Holy Night) Devotional

Our world, entangled in the chains of sin, desperately yearned for salvation. Humanity's endeavors, despite their nobility and fervor, could never bridge the chasm separating us from the divine. Yet, in His boundless love and wisdom, God orchestrated the greatest rescue mission ever known. As expressed in Phil Wickham's song "Behold," the Savior's arrival from heaven's glory to the cradle of Bethlehem is both unexpected and unparalleled. "Behold the King has come, divinity incarnate Creator of the world, breathing our air..." 1. A Divine Descent: The first verse encapsulates the magnitude of Jesus' coming. The King, the Creator, choosing to breathe our air, dwell among us, and shine His light in our midst is a profound mystery. This divine descent wasn't marked by royal fanfare but was wrapped in the humility of a baby's birth. It was a clear testament that God's ways are beyond human comprehension. 2. The Price of Love: "Behold the Father's love, beyond all comprehension He gave His only Son to die in our place..." The Father's love is profound and beyond our grasp. A love so great that He sacrificed His only Son to redeem us. Our salvation required more than just divine visitation; it demanded divine substitution. Jesus was not only born to teach, heal, and guide but, most importantly, to sacrifice Himself on the cross. His birth was a divine promise, and His death was the fulfillment of that promise. 3. The Joy of Christmas: "O Holy Night..." brings us to the reverential heart of Christmas. It invites us to drop to our knees in awe, echoing the melodies of angelic hosts, proclaiming the divinity of that sacred night. It isn't just about festive lights, joyful carols, or exchanging gifts. It's about pausing and realizing the immense depth of God's love, demonstrated in the birth and sacrifice of Jesus. 4. Eternal Worship: "Come let us adore Him..." beckons every heart to continuous worship. To adore Jesus is not just a seasonal act but an eternal commitment. Recognizing His worthiness and surrendering in adoration isn't merely a response to a song but should be the posture of our hearts each day. Today, as you ponder on the poignant themes of "Behold," allow your heart to be stirred afresh. The Savior's story isn't just a historical narrative but a living testament of God's unfailing love. In every circumstance, whether in moments of joy or amidst life's storms, let the truth of Jesus' sacrificial love anchor your soul. His coming wasn't just to illuminate a single night in Bethlehem but to brighten every facet of our lives. So, as you navigate your daily journey, may the chorus of "Behold" resonate within - driving you to ceaseless worship, profound gratitude, and unwavering faith. Let the wonder of Jesus' birth, death, and resurrection redefine your perspective, prompting you to live a life that continually beholds and magnifies the Savior.John 3:16 - "For God so loved the world that He gave His one and only Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life."

Song List
O Come O Come Emmanuel / Even So Come Devotional

The weaving together of the timeless carol "O Come O Come Emmanuel" and the modern worship anthem "Even So Come" takes us on a journey through history – from the expectant waiting of God's people for the coming Messiah to the present-day church's eager anticipation of His return. 1. Israel's Captivity and Our Exile: The initial verses of "O Come O Come Emmanuel" echo the deep yearning of the Israelites in exile, awaiting their promised deliverer. This sentiment parallels our own spiritual exile. While we're not in Babylon, we often find ourselves ensnared by sin, longing for true freedom. But just as God promised a Savior to Israel, He promises us salvation and deliverance through Christ. 2. The Dayspring and the Dawning Hope: The call for the 'Dayspring' to come is a beckoning for light to pierce the profound darkness that the world was entrenched in. Today, as we navigate through a world often marked by despair, uncertainty, and shadows, the advent of Christ offers a beacon of hope. He is the light that dispels gloom, renews our spirit, and guides us on our path. 3. Waiting with Purpose: The bridges of the song remind us that waiting isn't a passive activity. As believers, we actively wait with purpose and hope. This waiting isn't rooted in uncertainty but is anchored in the firm promise of God. We anticipate not just Christ's return, but the full realization of His Kingdom here on earth. 4. The Desire of Nations: The call for the 'Desire of nations' to come is powerful. Jesus isn't just the hope of a select few but of all people. He brings unity, mending the divisions, ending strife, and establishing peace. He's the embodiment of heaven's peace that our world desperately needs. 5. A Church in Expectation: As the carol transitions to "Even So Come", we're shifted from the historical anticipation of Christ's first coming to the present longing for His second coming. Just as a bride eagerly awaits her groom, the Church stands ready, with hearts full of hope, longing for the King's return. 6. The Assurance of His Return: The song culminates in a profound truth that ties both the past and present together. Whether it was the Israelites in exile or believers today, the refrain remains the same - Emmanuel, God with us, shall come. Drawing from the key scripture in Titus, we're reminded that our hope isn't just wishful thinking but a confident expectation. Jesus, our great God and Savior, has already come once, bringing salvation, and He will come again, ushering in a new era of eternal peace and joy. As we reflect on these songs and immerse ourselves in worship, let's allow our hearts to be filled with a renewed sense of hope. A hope that acknowledges the darkness but chooses to focus on the light. A hope that eagerly waits, knowing that our Savior, the Light of the World, has come and will surely come again. Today, let's join our voices with believers across ages, cultures, and circumstances and proclaim with joyous hope: "O come, O come Emmanuel. Even so come, Lord Jesus come."Titus 2:13 - "Looking for the blessed hope and glorious appearing of our great God and Savior Jesus Christ."

Song List
O Come All Ye Faithful (His Name Shall Be) Devotional

O Come All Ye Faithful has forever been one of my favorite Christmas songs! While every self-respecting musician has recorded their own rendition, I wanted to know the origins of the earliest hymn. It was written in Latin by John Francis Wade, a music copyist, and later adapted to English by Frederick Oakeley, an Anglican minister. Oakeley's first attempt at an English title was, “Ye Faithful, Approach Ye.” While the original title didn't stick around, the word “approach” stuck with me. It's a word full of invitation and desire. It's a request for our presence. It says, “Come near.” And it's a reminder that God is not far off. He is not distant or hiding himself from us. And that is the story and miracle of Christmas. “And the angel said unto them, 'Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.'” Luke 2:10-11 After four hundred years of silence, hope of our redemption was birthed once more—“word of the Father now in flesh appearing.” Jesus came from Heaven to Earth to close the gap between God and man, to pay the price for our sin so that we might approach His throne of grace with confidence because He knows it's at His throne that we “receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need” (Hebrews 4:16). The invitation for us today is to come adore the one who bought our healing, our wholeness, and our peace with God. Come, encounter the compassion, comfort, and kindness of our Savior. Come, approach with our heartache and our brokenness, with our wounds and our scars. Come, joyful and triumphant for our victor over sin, hurt, and pain has arrived! Based on the song O Come All Ye Faithful (His Name Shall Be) by Kristian Stanfill, JD Myers. Original post by Passion Music available on YouVersion based on the album - Hope Has A Name by Passion.

Song List
Manger Throne Devotional

In the midst of the joyful and bustling Christmas season, it is easy to get caught up in the festivities, the decorations, and the giving of gifts. We celebrate the birth of Jesus, the Son of God, who came to this world in the humblest of circumstances. The song Manger Throne by Phil Wickham beautifully captures the essence of this humble yet profoundly powerful event. The song begins by reflecting on the magnificence of God, the Creator of the universe, who could have arrived with great fanfare and splendor. He could have appeared in the grandeur of royalty and majesty, causing the entire world to bow down before Him. But instead, He chose meekness over majesty, wrapped His divine power in humanity. This choice reminds us of God's incredible love and humility. The King of kings, the Lord of lords, chose to enter our world not as a conqueror but as a vulnerable child in a lowly manger. This act of humility speaks volumes about God's character and His heart for humanity. "Glory be to You alone, King who reigns from a manger throne." This chorus reminds us that even in His humble entrance into the world, Jesus is the true King. He reigns from a manger throne, signifying that His kingship is not of this world, but it is eternal and spiritual. In response, we are called to give our lives, our praises, and everything we own to Jesus, the King who chose a manger over a throne. The second verse continues to emphasize the alternative choices that Jesus could have made. He could have walked into the heart of a powerful empire, revealing His splendor, but instead, He authored a better story in the small town of Bethlehem. He, the Creator of all things, entered this world through the arms of common people. His purpose was clear: to die for our redemption and rise so we can live. This verse underscores the redemptive plan of God. He chose the path of suffering, sacrifice, and ultimate victory to bring salvation to humanity. His birth in Bethlehem was just the beginning of His mission to reconcile us with the Father. "Glory be to You alone, King who reigns from a manger throne." This chorus reinforces the fact that Jesus' kingship is not defined by worldly standards. We are called to surrender everything we have to Him because He is the true King, the King who brings hope and salvation to the world. The bridge takes us on a journey from heaven to the cradle, emphasizing the significance of Jesus' incarnation. He left the glory of heaven to be born as a baby in a humble manger. This act of love is celebrated by both heaven and nature. The bridge also reminds us that even death could not hold Him; He overcame the grave, bringing the hope of eternal life to all who believe. "Glory be to You alone, King who reigns from a manger throne." This final chorus reiterates our commitment to give everything we have to Jesus, recognizing Him as the King who reigns from a manger throne. In the closing tag, we once again affirm that our lives, our praise, and everything we own belong to Jesus, the King who chose a manger over a throne. This song beautifully encapsulates the essence of Christmas: the humility, love, and sacrifice of our Savior, Jesus Christ. As you reflect on the message of Manger Throne, may it inspire you to embrace the humility and love of Jesus during this Christmas season and throughout the year. Just as the world was forever changed by the birth of Christ in that manger, may our hearts be transformed as we recognize and worship the King who reigns from a manger throne.

Song List
Bless God Devotional

“Does not all nature around me praise God? If I were silent, I should be an exception to the universe. Does not the thunder praise Him as it rolls like drums in the march of the God of armies? Do not the mountains praise Him when the woods upon their summits wave in adoration? Does not the lightning write His name in letters of fire? Has not the whole earth a voice? And shall I, can I, silent be?”-Charles Spurgeon. To ”bless God" is a phrase that some might find strange or counter-intuitive, as we are perhaps more familiar with the idea of blessing being something that comes from God to us, perhaps not as much so the other way around. But to bless God – to exalt, praise, magnify Him – becomes a habit – a first response - in the lives of those who have let themselves receive the love of the Lord. To bless God is really the only appropriate response to the realization that the only reason that the possibility exists of making the choice to bless Him is because He has first so richly blessed us. When we "bless God," we are not adding anything to God or giving Him something He lacks, because our Triune God is utterly complete. Rather, when we worship Him, when we declare that He is worthy to be praised, we are aligning ourselves with the truth of His worthiness of all praise and honor, we are rightly seeing the true order of things – you might even say we're aligning ourselves with reality. And when we align ourselves with reality by declaring His reign and His worth, bringing Him worship and sacrifices of praise, we're also entering into communion with the Father and participating in the relationship we were born for. Blessing and glorifying God is a pathway to the gift of His presence, the preciousness of His nearness, and the unspeakable treasures of the joy therein. C.S. Lewis expressed it this way:“The Scotch catechism says that man's chief end is 'to glorify God and enjoy Him forever.' But we shall then know that these are the same thing. Fully to enjoy is to glorify. In commanding us to glorify Him, God is inviting us to enjoy Him.” We bless God because we're made to. We bless God because we need to – I need to. We bless God because scripture invites us to, encourages us to, and commands us to! Psalm 150:6 “Let everything that has breath praise the Lord." Original post by Brooke Ligertwood available on YouVersion. A five-day reading plan exploring some of the Biblical perspectives that anchor Brooke's album, EIGHT. Enjoy devotionals that journey through themes like the fear of the Lord, postures in prayer, enduring in wilderness seasons, enjoying God, and choosing Him in response to His choice of us!, as well as featuring lyrics and music from songs throughout the Album EIGHT by Brooke Ligertwood.

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King Of Kings Devotional

In the darkness we were waiting Without hope, without light Till from heaven You came running There was mercy in Your eyes King of Kings Words and Music by Brooke Ligertwood, Scott Ligertwood & Jason Ingram © 2019 Hillsong Music Publishing Australia & Fellow Ships Music/So Essential Tunes (admin at EssentialMusicPublishing.com) There is no doubt - we all began in darkness. In fact, the earth itself was covered in darkness, until the Creator came and spoke light and breathed life into His creation. Today, God is still breathing life into dead things. Our kind Saviour is still bringing light to dark places, hope to hopeless situations, possibility to impossible circumstances. But before we entered His light, we were in darkness. And before we knew true life, we were destined for death. And before coming awake, we were asleep. The Bible puts it like this: “You were dead because of your sins and because your sinful nature was not yet cut away. Then God made you alive with Christ, for he forgave all our sins.” Colossians 2.13 (NIV) Earlier this year our Senior Pastor, Bobbie Houston, asked the question “Do you remember the day the lights went on?” What about you? Do you remember the day you found salvation, and the weight of sin lifted off you? The day that from heaven, Jesus came running with mercy in His eyes? Ready to awaken you to all of the hope, grace, peace and joy that is life with Jesus Christ. It is our prayer that you would remember that moment. That as you listen to the songs from this new album, the lyrics would remind you that you were once in darkness but have been brought into the light – illuminated now to illuminate others. Based on the song King Of Kings by Brooke Ligertwood, Scott Ligertwood, and Jason Ingrim. Original post by Hillsong Worship available on YouVersion based on the album - Awake by Hillsong Worship.

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